Port Canaveral Offshore

http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.jshttp://admin.brightcove.com/js/APIModules_all.jshttp://files.brightcove.com/bc-mapi.js// http://www.floridasportsman.com/wp-content/plugins/imo-video-gallery/js/imo-video-gallery.js

Recent offshore fishing reports from the East Central region.


Port Canaveral Offshore

Florida Sportsman member: tonytali

My son and I left Bluepoints at 7:30, seas were big and a little confused so it was slow going out but put lines in at 120 and within 10 minutes had a nice mahi.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 

 

 


East Central Dolphin Bite

Florida Sportsman member: DolphinTailin

We leave the weed patch and head off to the Southeast and not too far off we find a big blue crate just under the surface, As we pass the crate we look behind the boat and see tons of dolphin greyhounding through our spread, three guys on the boat and all four rods go down.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 

 


Sebastian Bull

Florida Sportsman member: TeamReelShady

We left the inlet at 5:30am and went out to 130 feet, with signs of life we put out lines trolled all the way to 240 feet, when we saw a massive weed line, dragged baits all over with no takers.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 


Port Canaveral Offshore

Florida Sportsman member: TIGHTLINEZOFFSHORE

So then we decided to head through 8a to the buoy trolling and had several short strikes and 3 cuda knock downs. Then in 100 feet we landed our first phin. On the way back line a red and white islander gets smoked then goes slack, finally catch up to the line and reel in a nice wahoo.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 


New Personal Best

Florida Sportsman member: dtm

I slowed the boat and looked back and this fish was jumping about 300yds back. Alex went to work pumping and winding. After a while the fish came alongside we got a good look and seen he was a nice one.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 

 


Ponce Offshore Fun

Florida Sportsman member: Koifarmer

We then freelined some squid wrapped in chumdrop chum balls and it did not take long before we were hooked up . The fish were shy , 15 pound fluorocarbon and a small circle hook did the trick. We lost many many fish , but did manage to get 4 fish up to 9 pounds.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 


Cobia X7

Florida Sportsman member: Paragon1

“After about an hour or so we finally got to my first spot to try for some early morning cobia. We weren’t disappointed. On the first drop we had two hits, with me getting the hookup.”

Want to catch cobia like these? Click here for how-to videos, feature stories, and more.


Tripletail Fun

Florida Sportsman member: Docked Wages

Some chunky bamboo we came across north of the Port last friday. After releasing a few shorts we motored up and filmed a variety of species co-mingling underneath. Two Tripletail stuck around for the video.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 


East Central Dolphin and Coia

Florida Sportsman member: Paragon1

My boat is too low to the water to sight fish them effectively, so instead I prefer jigging deep structure. So in 100 plus feet of water we started working. First one came aboard on about the third drift, when I spotted them on the finder and decided to drop one last time before resetting. Nice 35 pounder to start the day.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 


Port Canaveral Offshore

Florida Sportsman member: Hotpursuit

With fish in the box, things slow for a bit as we continue east. We found scattered weeds and what appeared to be an upwelling or something with dirty green water on the edge of the stream. Start working the area when the close pink and white skirted hoo gets slammed for the second time.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 


December Dolphin Bite

Florida Sportsman member: cflcycleparts

The water temp was a bleak 70 degrees, our only hope was to make it into the warmer waters of the stream. We make our way out to the cones about 30 miles out and find 74.99 degree water. It’ll do. We happen to run by some debris including a floating log with weeds around it, and then pandemonium.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 


Sebastian Offshore

Florida Sportsman member: bighardey

We put the lines back out and slow trolled at 5 knots and about 11:15 on blue & green Islander skirted ballyhoo the hoo hits hard, heads deep. Yanked her back to the boat nice and easy, gaffed and put in the box. It was a super day and good to be back.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 


Record Breaker Out of Ponce

Florida Sportsman member: InLimbo

No further bite came after the first couple of hits. I said, “maybe you should drop down a little more and she interrupted and said “no, no, no, she’es still there I know it” so I shut up and watched as we both concentrated on the rod tip then the rod tip just bent straight down, her face turned red and all of her effort when into turning the reel and it was on. Hook up! She was right, she was still there. The 15 minute battle began.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 


Red Snapper and More out of Ponce Inlet

Florida Sportsman member: Fool’s Gold

Made some stops early Friday way south and shallower to try and get away, we did get away from the crowd but also the snapper. Moved out to around 95 feet and caught our limit rather quickly up to 15 pounds. Picked up a few triggers, sea bass and a cobia both days.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 


Hitting the Nearshore Numbers

Florida Sportsman member: Davidson

Good day nearshore. We were on fish all day in about 50 feet of water. A lot of big jacks, Bonita, sharks, and a few cobia were still around. We were able to get a couple for the freezer. Water has definitely warmed up, showing 76 degrees all day.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 


Canaveral Dolphin

Florida Sportsman member: Canaveral Offshore

Forum member Canaveral Offshore found the Dolphin in the east central section. Multiple trips producing great numbers of quality fish. Fishing in 120 to 240 feet of water.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 

 


First Hoo and A Good One at That

Florida Sportsman member: psless

Made it to about 165 feet and saw some weed lines so we began trolling. Fairly early in the morning we snagged this beast on a mono leader. Hook was barely in his mouth when we gaffed him! Not a bite the rest of the day. Had some sushi this past weekend, awesome! First time catching and eating wahoo.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 


Cobia Chaos

Florida Sportsman member: Keystroke

I soon realize that he is trying to save his other rod that has fallen in the water. You see the jig pole he had sat down in the heat of the moment had gotten caught in the prop and was yanked in the water. I watch the cobia disappear yet again as Dave splashes headfirst within 15 feet of her. So I’m standing there with my live sardine dangling, watching this spectacle. I pitch the sardine into the water, stick the rod in a holder, flip the bail open and go to assist my man overboard.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 


Port Canaveral Offshore

Florida Sportsman member: captryan5878

First bait in was a large split tail mullet that got tagged in the prop wash as I was dropping it back. Got a 30 pound bull almost boat side and flipped a tipped jig to about a 15 pound cow that was trailing. Both came unglued 5 seconds later. Depressing, but it was a good sign. Got our 5 bait spread deployed with a variation of split tail mullet and skirted hoos. Every color produced strikes. Ended up with 5 quality fish in the boat up to 25 pounds.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 


Sebastian Inlet Phins

Florida Sportsman member: beachsideandy

Checked out some stacked weed lines from 72 to 80 feet, but the water was still cold. Headed out to around 250 feet where we had a temperature change of 73.5 to 75.5 degrees with a good amount of weeds mixed in. Picked up four phins with this one being the largest. They seemed to be hitting small green and green and yellow lures with medium hoos, pretty close to the boat, clipped down off the transom.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 


Solo Trip Produces Dinner

Florida Sportsman member: ownleme

Found a great rip in 330 feet with a 3 degree temperature change 73 to 76 degrees, scattered weed line, and ripping current on the east side. First strike before 8am and kept coming. At one point I had just put one in the box, had one still pulling on another line, and tossed my alien head at its shadow to hook up with 20 plus pounder.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 


Plan B, for Bottom

Florida Sportsman member: Keystroke

Cobia sight fishing conditions were poor so we decided to work some bottom spots. We got on one spot that was loaded with big triggers. They showed nicely on the Furuno elevated above the reef. It was sweet hooking them on a 2 ounce jig with strip. Popping this on the bottom was fun and more productive than a typical trigger rig. But, when my fancy jigging rod doubled over, I said “that’s no trigger boys”. I’d work her up a few pumps then she’d tear the 30 pound braid right back off.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 


East Central Dolphin Days

Florida Sportsman member: captryan5878

Pulled skirted hoo’s with a variety of colors including green, pink and blue. Also dragged a few large split tail mullet down deep. No certain color worked better than the other. Put 10 good dolphin on ice including 2 very nice cows! Lost a monster 40 pound class bull boat side. It was painful to watch him swim off, but at the same time, we ended up with more meat than we know what to do with. Great day on the water.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 


Light Tackle Red Snapper

Florida Sportsman member: Keystroke

But this time the light line held and after several sizzling runs Sam worked the fish ever so slowly to the surface. When I saw the sow snapper I couldn’t believe its size and that Sam had landed it on such light gear. I became a little sad as I realized that I would never be able to bust his chops again for his use of baby fishing gear while bottom fishing.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 


Ponce Wahoo and King

Florida Sportsman member: dtm

Took out my Buddy John along with my boy Charlie. We got an early start and made some good bait. Seas were sloppy all day. We tried the bottom first which stayed sharked up. We mostly worked deeper at 140 feet, where we found red snapper and sharks. We then went to 180 and got away from most of the sharks. Had a couple AJs on. One came unbuttoned and put one in the boat. Decided to go on the troll for barracudas and bonitos and then we score with a Wahoo. There are some shrimpers out there in about 180 feet. We anchored up we worked our way toward one and got slammed again a smoker king[…]

Click here for full forum report.


Ponce Inlet Red Snapper

Florida Sportsman member: Blue

Took a beating getting out – our original plan was to hit a couple of the deep spots at 35 miles or so. At 17 the pounding got so bad we called an audible. Right then we lost the DSM sounder – so now we got to fish blind….no fish finder makes it tough to catch bottom fish. Put the radar on and looked for other boats. Pulled out the paper charts and did a quick cross reference with spots loaded into the GPS plotter… off to a public site (11). Pretty much non stop action once we were able to mark where the first fish were hitting. A few break offs – probably shark or cuda. Bunch of small ARS as well got donated to the BIG cuda’s hanging out under the boat – but we made it and turned in some decent numbers.

Click here for full forum report.


Sebastian Inlet Wahoo

Florida Sportsman member: Cabanaboy

Short n sweet… We headed out of Sebastian Inlet Saturday am around 5:45 am… We heard the bite has been hot around 120 feet, so with the seas a bit fussy we put it at 100 feet around 7 am. We used our typical spread with 2 trolling weights, 2 outriggers, 1 short line, and 1 shotgun. We landed a barracuda immediately. Ten minutes later the shotgun goes off with the horse ballyhoo purple and black islander with 8 ounce chin weight, yes 8 oz. We had our first wahoo of the season on the deck.

We loose our second engine during the fight.. bad prime bulb i believe…we end up tacking between 95 and 125..weeds everywhere but the winds did not allow any formation…ended up landing 2 peanut dolphin around 24-25″ that got sent back to the ocean Gods…

Click here for full forum report.


Port Canaveral Red Snapper & Dolphin

Florida Sportsman member: Sea Hunt

Left the dock about 7:30 – did not see any readily available bait fish , so just went with frozen ballyhoos. Arrived at 8a with maybe a dozen other boats already there. For about an hour we trolled around without a strike, nor did we notice anybody else doing any better. As some other boats left – we headed to the weather buoy. Arriving near the buoy , put out the Ballyhoo with Sea Witches in front. Within 15 minutes we got this Dolphin which apparently was all by himself out there ! For the next hour – all we got was one shark after the other – all in the 2 to 3 feet size range. Decided to get away from the sharks – so set course for the inlet just before noontime. With 15 more miles to the inlet, we spotted a couple flying fish in some widely scattered weeds at about 85 feet deep. We put out the baits again and wound up getting this red snapper on the ballyhoo/sea witch rig ! As we got the snapper coming up near the surface, we saw over a dozen school mates following him up !

Click here for full forum report.


Seabastian Mangrove Snapper & More

Florida Sportsman member: Kapt.Hook

Dirty water! Stated out at bethal trolling with nothing to show for it. then headed up to the 90′ bar drifting the NE current 1.5 knots live ballyhoo on the flat line got nailed but ended up pulling the hook. It seemed like it was a good size king but who knows.. We then anchored up on one of the county sites and got some nice hits at first but the hook couldn’t find the sweet spot, then I finally was able to berry my hook into one of the biggest mangos Iv caught so I guess I could say its my personal best. Black sea bass are everywhere and of good size we didnt catch any under 12 inches. I was unsure of the season dates State vs Federal so they were all released. We were using pogy chunks. Water was green/dirty everywhere we went[…]

Click here for full forum report.


Phins Off Ponce Inlet

Florida Sportsman member: higmister

We left the dock at 6 and headed east. The ride out was bumpy but the seas laid down for us in the afternoon. Started seeing flyers and birds in the 200 feet range and lines out. First knock down on the first bait out before we could even put it in the outrigger. Stayed between 200-280 all day. We took 26 phins and a wahoo home. Released some peanuts and a ton of short strikes. Top skirts was blue/green and white/black.

Click here for full forum report.


Port Canaveral Cobia

Florida Sportsman member: Off Shore Dude

Went out today looking for some tripletails and shaking down my brothers boat. To my delight, what I thought was a tripletail turned out to be a cobia. Not a giant fish but after such a lousy cobia season it made my day. Had fun catching him on light tackle. Was using a 1/4 ounce pink jig head with a large live shrimp w/tail fin removed (hooked backwards).

Also, we were out in the Banana river Sunday afternoon and the trout bite was great. I think we caught about 10 trout (upper slot) and some huge ladyfish. Basically fished the biggest mullet schools we could find. Caught them on live mullet and 1/8 ounce jig heads w/soft baits. Released everything.

Click here for full forum report.


Port Canaveral Dolphin

Florida Sportsman member: Full Throttle

We started out late, with no intentions of fishing all day.Just wanted to check things out before the tournament was called on Saturday. Ran out and found a sweet rip and weedline at 140 and 190 feet, but water didn’t look great. I tossed two baits out and trolled for about 20-30 minutes just to see. With no luck, we pulled up and ran out deeper until I finally found some clean water finally at 850 feet and 38 miles out found a sweet rip and weedline. I put the full spread out and within 5 minutes we had our first knockdown. We re-rigged and 20 minutes later a big dolphin comes storming the spread from the line. We watched her get behind 2 lures before finally crushing the dolphin colored islander! The fish goes crazy and it is an awesome sight to see! My wife grabs the rod and 20 minutes later we put the 32 pound cow in the boat. Biggest cow I have seen

Click here for full forum report.


Port Canaveral Dolphin & Tripletail

Florida Sportsman member: InLimbo

The “gettin-her-wet” fishing trip turned into a camping trip with the RV to Jetty Park and a trolling trip for 5 teenagers for my sons 19th bday. I was happy to ablige. Headed out first light even with the weather questionable but were greeted with decent seas. Hit the edge of the stream wet the first line and was hit with the rod in my hand before I could get into the rod holder. No jumping equaled a bonita but quickly picked up the first small dolphin. After a slow troll and a weakening rip decided to head deeper only to find a great rip, color change and weeds where we had more than 15 knock downs, including a tripletail and 10 dolphin in the box. Nothing huge but the boys loved it and we had some restocking material for the freezer.

Click here for full forum report.


Port Canaveral Dolphin & Amberjacks

Florida Sportsman member: ACME Ventures Fishing

Clearing conditions Tuesday allowed us to find some nice color changes and weedlines that though not teaming with fish did produce. We picked up some Mahi before fighting AJ’s. A lot of Cuda’s and Sharks at the wrecks, but we still filled up on AJ’s. The AJ’s Tuesday were mostly just over the min size, but with hardly a worm in them were great for the icebox. With a couple youngsters onboard not big enough to tackle the AJ’s, we finished the day on shallower structure so they could have some fun. We got Cobia this way, not huge but big enough to take home! Wednesday was much less productive. While we did battle a lot of fish, more short AJ’s, Cuda and Shark that anything.

Click here for full forum report.


Ponce Inlet Surprise

Florida Sportsman member: Docked Wages

Not a great weekend for fishing but we managed to get out for a few hours Saturday morning and again Sunday afternoon.

Saturday we ran out of Sebastian on the Head Hunter to troll for dolphin and found it to be slow due to the cold water. The temps were less than 72 degrees all the way out to 180’ and there we released a few peanuts before landing an nice 18 pounder. We put him on ice and headed in to look for cobia but the 66 degree water inside was not conducive to hold fish so we made and early day of. Back at the ramp the FWC guy checked our fish box and found another peanut on ice with our catch. Seeing no skin on this one he gave us a pass as this fish was regurgitated from the stomach of the bigger dolphin. Just goes to show that everything eats a dolphin, even other dolphin.

Sunday looked like real nice cobia weather until we decided to go at 1 pm. After getting on the water around 2pm the wind shifted and started to increase. We chased some free swimmers around until the clouds moved in. As the afternoon advanced, the winds increased and it began to get sporty and wet for a flats boat. Tough conditions for sight fishing so we made an early afternoon of it and came home for cobia St Patty dinner.

Click here for full forum report.


Ponce Inlet Surprise

Florida Sportsman member: Davidson

Me and my buddy Carlos went out of Ponce inlet Tuesday looking for some of those brown bombers. We headed up and down the beach with nothing to show for it until we came up on a school of what looked like red fish. We motored in front of the school and casted choice live baits at the school and got snubbed over and over. I switched up to a jig with squid and bam! Hooked up I finally wrestled it to the boat and to our surprise it was the biggest black drum I have ever seen, let alone caught.

Click here for full forum report.


First Fish on New Boat

Florida Sportsman member: Final Point

een looking to upgrade my bayboat and after 5 months of searching I finally came accross my new baby….a 2007 Triton 240 LTS! Had to go to Tx to get her but now she’s mine. So after getting her here, I decided to go out and see if the Triton could catch fish or not.

We made quick work of a livewell full of threadfins and hit the inlet. On the first drift we had a double hook-up on jumbo redfish. Mine came unglued but my wife whipped hers into submission[…]

Click here for full forum report.


Port Canaveral Offshore

Florida Sportsman member: Reel Finatic

Put lines in at 160 feet and trolled out to 300 feet with only one wahoo. Which was lost at the boat. Neighbors father was down from Boston, So I wanted to show him what a red snapper looked like. We caught Numerous red snapper and we were rewarded with a nice gag grouper. All fish were vented and swam back to the bottom. Sure wish we could have brought the grouper home with us While bottom fishing we had a school of dolphin come to the boat, we were able to boat 3 of them. Trolled awhile longer and boated one more schoolie dolphin. Then called it a day In by 2:00.

Click here for full forum report.


More Trips at the Port

Florida Sportsman member: codered13

Had a great day out on the water last week with by brother. We were using live shrimp under some floating grass. Caught our limit fairly quick and left them biting before we got locked up. They were everywhere!

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 


Port Canaveral Tripletail

Florida Sportsman member: QuiksilverIHB

Went out of the port again and caught some nice tripletail. Some on buoys, some on seaweed, and some free swimming/sitting. Got them from 30 feet all the way to 50 feet It’s cool, because I kill the motor as I get close and they hide under my boat. It’s like they think it is floating garbage. The biggest one weighed in at 21lbs.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 


Sebastian Offshore Marlin

Florida Sportsman member: togators

A very quite day, only 1 hit. Then in 400 feet at 1:00 port rigger pops and line begins to scream out of a Penn 330 with 30 pound mono with a red/white skirted rigged ballyhoo. Did not want to horse it in because of the light tackle, 2 hours 45 minutes later we finally get it in. Line was wrapped on bill pretty well and the double hooks were set deep in the bottom jaw so we pulled in to clear, photo then released.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 


Tripletail Out of the Port

Florida Sportsman member: QuiksilverIHB

Went out of Port Canaveral and we got some nice Tripletail on jigheads with live shrimp. Didn’t see any cobia, but it was still well worth it. The biggest one went for 18 pounds.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 


End of the Year Wahoo

Florida Sportsman member: fltekdiver

Had my buddy cancelle this last night due to Christmas Eve family get together.Left Port Canaveral by myself at 8:00am Christmas Eve in my 21 foot Proline WA. Started out at Reef 8A, catching some bonitas, in Hopes of a big king! After the bonitas stripped half a dozen of my ballyhoo, I headed out to the 20 mile weather Buoy. By the time I got out there, wind had picked up ad it was overcast. The seas were about 3 to 4 feet.I switched all the skirts over to Black & Red, Black/Purple/Red etc for Wahoo […]

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 

 


Epic Day Out of the Port

Florida Sportsman member: Cabanaboy

What a beautiful day to fish! Loaded up the 19 footer and headed east. We left the port around 530 am and had the throttle wide open the whole way. We headed east and found some weed at 160′…3 dolphin in the boat,no misses. We kept moving east. We had 4 lines down and 4 dolphin doing arial acrobatics. Landed 2 and lost 2. headed east to 400′ where oh me oh my the debris was everywhere and fields of weed..[…]

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 

 


Clean Water, Steady Action

Florida Sportsman member: tonytali

…Water was clear and blue on the east side. There was debri on the edge but it was pretty scattered and did not appear to be holding anything in particular. Action was steady and we caught a few more baracudas, three sharks (triple header), and boated five phins (10-15 lbs). […]

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 


Dolphin and Blackfin off of Sebastian Inlet

Florida Sportsman member: inxanth

Started off setting lines and was surprised to hook up with a blackfin. Within an hour and a half went four for six on blackfin, which is a rare treat, especially not that far from Bethel Shoals. Stumbled across a weedline that was about three miles long. Trolled it up and back four times and boated four dolphin out of six […]

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 


Three Days off Ponce

Florida Sportsman member: InLimbo

Docked boat at Down The Hatch Thursday night for her three day stay. Out of the inlet at 7 with a net full all three days. Calm seas Friday and Saturday and a little heavy on Sunday. Most fish caught in 100 to 120 and 140. Warmer water in 80 feet then cooled down a bit further out. Lots of bait and activity on the water all weekend. The guests on Friday and Saturday limited on red snapper within about an hour. Several big ones came off so we changed the tackle for Saturday and the overall size increased […]

Click here for full forum report.


PC Snapper Limit

Florida Sportsman member: donh

Well, I got an itch to get a few snapper Sunday morning after looking at the bouy report so I called my neighbors (Bill and Denise) and they said they were in. Loaded boat and on our way at 10 a.m we stopped got a few gallons of gas, hit sunrise, grabbed a couple dozen pinfish (didn’t want to spend any time catching bait, it was already late), hit the ramp and off we went […]

 

 


Snapper Biting out of Ponce

Florida Sportsman member: InLimbo

Started with a really nice fun trip out of Ponce with the snotty seas that took us over an hour and a half just to get to 80 feet for the first stop. Did I say fun? Very much a roller coaster ride. We new we would see the this and then thought we would probably find that the bottom was all stirred up. It was. Dirty water and a strong current kept the sharks happy when we came off. Winds laid down and following seas for the ride in were nice […]

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 

 


East Central Mixed Bag

Florida Sportsman member: capt mike mann

The sight casting for reds and trout in mosquito lagoon has been pretty good in extremely shallow water. They both have been tailing in the grass and are eating fly, live shrimp and gulp shrimp. There is still some water clean enough to find cruising reds the secret is to move very slow. Offshore the mangrove and red snapper have been eating well […]

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 


Solid Offshore Bite off PC

Florida Sportsman member: ACME Ventures Fishing

Another week fishing, with greatly varied seas and fishing. The fishing has been much like the water temps, hot and cold. The cold water has moved the fish around, and had them biting one day, and tight lipped the next. The fish are also on the move, with big bottom fish often in close and shallow waters […]

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 


Port Canaveral: Hot Bottom Bite

Florida Sportsman member: ACME Ventures Fishing

Another day of fair weather and fishing. Winds were forecast to pick up, and that usually means the seas will follow. We have a nice breeze all day, and the sea’s stayed fairly nice all day. Fishing is still a question mark however, with pockets of cool bottom and dirty water creating issues […]

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 


Kingfish at 8A

Florida Sportsman member: Sea Hunt

Had more time to fish today but my early start was a bit delayed by a submarine heading out to sea. We had to go all the way down to the Church steeple to find any Pogeys. They were so close up on the beach – it seemed one wrong wave and we would be near aground ! – Reading a scant 4 foot on the sounder – one lucky toss of the net gave us plenty to fill the baitwell.

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 


Nice Bull Off Sebastian

Florida Sportsman member: Cabanaboy

Headed out around 5:30 a.m., shot straight out to the west edge where there was a nice rip, but no weeds. Ran out to 500 feet and didn’t see much so we headed back to our rip and found some weeds further north. Trolled it and landed a big bull on a 24oz. trolling weight with a blue and white islander […]

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 

 


Florida Sportsman member: ACME Ventures Fishing

With a guest from China and a fishing T=tackle manufactuer on board, we were hoping to find some nice catches this trip. It turned out just fine! We still have fish being found in places that you don’t typically find them […]

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 

 


Holy Pompano!

Doug Gabbert sent in this report of an offshore fishing treat, a monster African pompano, nice catch!

Fischer and I fished the mullet schools all day Saturday for trout, reds and snook. Fischer said he wanted to catch a “big” fish offshore on Sunday, so, we loaded the boat with four 20 pound Shimano Baitrunners and headed out the Sebastian Inlet early Sunday morning. We found several nice pods of greenies off Disney Vero, filled up the live well and headed towards Bethel Shoal to see what we could find. We pulled up on the #10 buoy on the shoal – there were four other boats fishing around it. Fischer tossed a greenie off the bow and almost instantly a school of large African pompano blew the greenie out of the water. The greenie made a mad dash for the boat, but the fish in the picture was faster and ate the bait right beside the boat. The fish literally hit the side of the boat while eating the greenie!

The fight was on. We chased the fish around for a half hour, it gave us some really smoking runs but Fischer was finally able to get it to the side of the boat. I did not want to gaff it, we did not want to kill it, so I put on gloves and was able to get it in the boat after a couple tries. The fish was gassed, so it did not put up much fight at the boat. We snapped a quick picture, then Fischer revived the fish and watched it swim away. Not a bad first cast and Fischer got his wish for a big fish!

 

 

 


PC Offshore Report

Florida Sportsman member: ACME Ventures Fishing

So, were used to NOAA’s forecast being off quite a bit, but this is one trip I’m glad they were off. The forecast was fro seas at 3-4 feet and winds around 10 knots. We barely had a breeze all day, and sea’s never got above 2 feet! It was probably one of the nicer days on the water of the year. Fishing however was somewhat slow, but with great weather we did not mind […]

Click here for full forum report.

 

 

 


PC Dolphin Catching

Florida Sportsman member: Slacktide

I took a couple that has fished with me a few times in the past and one of my main fishing buddies offshore yesterday. We had 2 dolphin in the box at 1230. I was getting bummed. I had 3 dozen hoo’s prepped with not much to show this late in the game. It turned on in the 4th quarter and we were cleaning dolphin until 11 pm. With a slow morning behind us we decided to pull lines n run out a little further […]

Click here to see the full forum report.

 

 


Ponce Offshore Gold

Florida Sportsman member: Fool’s Gold

Ran out to 100 feet and found some scattered weeds and a small rip, put the baits in and was pretty busy for about an hour, went 4 for 7 on fins, 3 bailers and a peanut. Also caught a shark trolling, haven’t seen that one. Slowed down so went out deeper and trolled for awhile, no luck so dropped a bait down on the 28 ledge and picked up the AJ. Went back to trolling to have a triple hook up and not land one of them, 2 short strikes and one shook the hook when it jumped, overall nice day on the water.

Click here to see the full forum report.

 

 


Team Bloodstream Trip to Venice

Florida Sportsman member: Docked Wages

This is not a local report but the anglers are. The crew of the F/V Bloodstream loaded up and dragged a new 2011 35 ST Contender on a long haul to Venice LA. The crew making the long haul by vehicle consisted of boat owner and Captain Brian Rimer with Scott Lerhman, Chris Hudson, Billy Fazio and myself […]

Click here to see the full forum report.

 

 

 


Sebastian Inlet Offshore Wahoo

Florida Sportsman member: jetpilot

Another slow day of fishing. Still no fish being caught most boats gave up and went bottom fishing. There was also the option to go king fishing outside the inlet with the fleet but opted not to.0I decided to look for wahoo back in at 130′ where we caught our last one on Friday. Started out in 170′ worked out to 350′ and then picked up and ran into 130′. Trolled around there for a few hours and Michelle our mate picked up this wahoo. Any wahoo is a good wahoo in my book!

Click here to see the full forum report.

 

 


Port Canaveral Offshore

Florida Sportsman member: ACME Ventures Fishing

Today was a reef trip, anchored up for the day at 8. Seas were choppy, but not too bad, so despite a wet ride out, it was fast and we were soon fishing. Once there, we set a bait on the planer making a pass down the reef until we got to our target bottom site. It didn’t take long to find a fish.

Click here to see the full forum report.

 

 

 

 


Port Canaveral Dolphins and Hoo’s

Florida Sportsman member: ACME Ventures Fishing

This was a little personal fishing time Saturday. With nice seas, I fish with a friend on his boat and got to both fish, enjoy the ride, rather than the norm, which though fun, is WORK! At 130′ we found a very well formed rip which proved to be a fish highway. Mo

Advertisements
Standard

Pine Tree Drive mid-century home lists for $19.9M

4385PineTreeDrive

4385 Pine Tree Drive, Miami Beach

A waterfront estate on Miami Beach’s Pine Tree Drive has hit the market for $19.9 million, next door to a new spec home that sold for $19.5 million last week.

The 6,592-square-foot newly listed property, at 4385 Pine Tree Drive, has eight bedrooms, six bathrooms and two half baths, including a guest house. It has a gated driveway and sits on a 35,300-square-foot lot with 100 feet of water frontage.

Michele Redlich of Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate has the listing. The asking price equates to $3,019 per square foot.

Miami-Dade property records show the owner, Alyssa Baumgarten, paid $743,000 for the home in 1990. It was built in 1950. 

The home features a formal dining room, living and media rooms, a master suite with dual bathrooms, and a private guest house. Recent upgrades include a renovated kitchen, with wood cabinetry, granite countertops, dual stainless-steel appliances and an island.  

Pine Tree Drive is among several streets in Miami Beach that have drawn the interest of spec home developers. Last week Todd Glaser and Sean Posner and Jarrett Posner sold a spec home they developed at 4395 Pine Tree Drive for $19.5 million to a trust managed by Lisa A. Schneider.

Douglas Elliman’s Brett Harris, who had listed the home, said the sale marked a new record on the street, following his sale two years ago for a Pine Tree Drive home at $14.25 million.

The owners of Cibo Wine Bar earlier this month listed their newly built home at 5501 Pine Tree Drive for $8.49 million, or $1,633 per square foot.

New rules will affect future home development in Miami Beach. Earlier this month, the Miami Beach Commission moved toward limiting the lot and unit size of new single-family homes being built in Miami Beach. Under the new rules, a developer planning to build a 5,000-square-foot home on a 10,000-square-foot lot would have to reduce the house’s size by 500 square feet.

Standard

Where is Miami in the real estate cycle on the eve of 2016?

Skyline+Speakers

Miami skyline (Credit: Wyn Van Devanter), from left: Carlos Melo, Ugo Colombo, Gil Dezer, David Polinsky and Jack McCabe

Despite high confidence among prominent Miami developers that the real estate market is not due for a significant downturn in 2016, some experts are cautioning that sales will continue to dip, which could possibly ignite a mild recession by the end of the year.

“We are going to see prices continue to appreciate through the first half of year, but at a much slower pace,” said Jack McCabe, founder and CEO of McCabe Research and Consulting. “In the last half of the year, we will see prices flatten, increases in inventory and slowing demand from buyers.”

Acknowledging condo sales are moving slower, CMC Group CEO Ugo Colombo told The Real Deal he believes it’s a sign of a healthy real estate market. “It is leveling off at a sustainable rate,” Colombo said. “You cannot expect to keep selling 100 units a month. Right now, there is a healthy balance of supply and demand.”

Since mid-2014, the influx of foreign buyers that fueled an unprecedented condo boom after the 2008 recession has tapered off due to foreign currencies losing value against the rising U.S. dollar. Yet Colombo said the South Florida condo market has become so diversified that it can weather economic trouble in countries from which developers cull buyers.

“We are seeing more Europeans, as well as Middle Eastern and Asian buyers who were not here before,” Colombo said. He added his company’s Brickell Flatiron project is experiencing steady sales activity among buyers from Colombia, Mexico, the Caribbean and domestic markets like New York.

Carlos Melo, a principal of the Melo Group, which has developed apartment and condo projects in Edgewater and the Arts & Entertainment District, said he sees a consolidation in the real estate market in the upcoming year.

“I don’t think there are going to be many new projects getting off the ground if they haven’t already,” Melo said. “We are still absorbing the product that is coming online. We are not getting ahead of ourselves in the real estate industry.”

Gil Dezer, whose company Dezer Development is building Porsche Design Tower and Residences by Armani/Casa in Sunny Isles Beach, told TRD some of the slowdown can be attributed to a more cautious real estate industry.

“All our projects in Sunny Isles Beach have been staggered six to eight months from each other,” Dezer said. “There are not a ton of closings taking place in one day and we are not putting a ton of units out there at one time.”

Dezer said 2016 could see more buyers of condos that have been recently finished or near completion starting to put up their properties for resale as prices for newer pre-construction units become more expensive. “I think resales are going to do very well,” Dezer said.

However, recent statistics indicate the South Florida condo market is beginning to overextend itself. According to a December market report by the Association of Miami Realtors, there were 14,770 existing condo transactions through November, down from 17,142 during the same period in 2013 and 16,409 from January to November 2014.

As sales have slowed, the number of condo buildings under construction or in the planning stages continues to skyrocket. The Realtor’s association report notes 38 towers totaling 3,639 units have been completed east of I-95 in Miami-Dade County since 2011. Another 74 towers with a combined 10,148 units are under construction. An additional 65 towers with a total of 9,131 units have been announced, but have not begun development.

A third-quarter condo market report prepared by Integra Realty Resources for Miami’s Downtown Development Authority noted the downtown Miami residential development was “firmly in the middle of its market cycle.” The report also stated that the beginning of 2016 will mark the largest increase in supply in nearly a decade with more than 3,000 units of rental and condominium inventory.

Furthermore, condo sales are significantly dependent on all cash buyers, who predominantly hail from foreign countries. According to the Realtor’s association, 67.5 percent of condo closings were made in cash in the month of November, which is more than double the average of 24 percent in the rest of the United States.

The combination of primarily relying on all cash buyers, an oversupply of condos, and a slowdown in sales is a recipe for another recession, McCabe told TRD.

“I think there are a lot of people putting blinders on and burying their heads in the sand that there is not going to be a downturn beginning in the next two years,” McCabe said. “They better wake up and start paying attention to the economic indicators. We will see another recession. It won’t be as severe as the last one, but it will have a negative effect on real estate down here.”

David Polinsky, a principal in Fortis Design Build, a firm developing mixed-use projects in Wynwood, said 2016 will serve as a test for luxury condo developers who have not reached the buyer reservation threshold needed to begin construction on their projects. “There will be some thinning out,” Polinsky said. “We don’t expect to see a lot of new condo projects announced this year.”

The glut of luxury condos will benefit mixed-use infill projects away from the waterfront. “Now that there is critical mass in neighborhoods like MiMo, Brickell, downtown Miami, and Wynwood, these areas need better retail components and more rental,” Polinsky said. “Those projects will continue to get activated and get underwritten. It’s a sign the market is maturing.”

 

Standard

PMG borrows $34M for unsold units at Echo Aventura

Echo Aventura and Kevin Maloney

Echo Aventura and Kevin Maloney

New York-based Property Markets Group closed on a $33.8 million condo inventory loan last week for unsold units at Echo Aventura, county records show.

Ryan Shear, Carlos Ott and Kevin Maloney

Ryan Shear, Carlos Ott and Kevin Maloney

PMG, led by Kevin Maloney, took the low leverage loan out for 25 units, including upper and lower penthouse units. Three units are in the west tower and the remaining 22 are in the east tower, according to the mortgage. The development sold the other 165 units and expects to sell out next year, PMG principal Ryan Shear told The Real Deal.

“It’s typical in projects when we have retired equity and debt and are left with a balance of inventory,” Shear said.

An affiliate of Benefit Street Partners, an investment arm of Providence Equity Partners, is the lender. Benefit Street Partners manages more than $11 billion in assets, according to its website.

Echo Aventura marks the first completed South Florida condo project for PMG this real estate cycle and the third completed condo project in Aventura since the cycle began in 2011. The two 12-story towers, at 3250 and 3300 Northeast 188th Street, include 190 units. PMG began recording closings for the development in mid-August, according to Miami-Dade County records.

Carlos Ott is the project architect and Yabu Pushelberg designed the interiors. The 5-acre development includes amenities such as access to a bayfront infinity edge pool, a 4,000-square-foot fitness center, two private porte cochere entrances and an event room, marketing materials show. Units are fully furnished, and feature summer kitchens and Apple home technology. Prices range from $700 per square foot to more than $1,000 per square foot, Shear said.

Earlier this month, PMG partnered with Greybrook Securities and Greybrook Realty Partners on the luxury condo component of 300 Biscayne in downtown Miami.

Standard

The Devil in Your Fuel

http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.jshttp://admin.brightcove.com/js/APIModules_all.jshttp://files.brightcove.com/bc-mapi.js// http://www.floridasportsman.com/wp-content/plugins/imo-video-gallery/js/imo-video-gallery.js

Run your boat often, run your boat smart.

 

Water and debris in bottom half of filter means a visit to the shop is in order.

 

If it’s been three months or longer since you last ran your boat, consider having the fuel system serviced. If you’re buying a used boat which has sat idle for an indeterminate time, definitely get her in the shop before firing her up.

 

I was reminded of this while watching Wayne Watson remove the cowling on a pristine, garage-kept bass boat at Governors Creek Marine in Green Cove Springs. “Guy brought it in here and said it hasn’t been cranked in over two years,” said Watson. “Take a look at what comes out of the fuel filter.” He emptied the decomposed gasoline from the spin-on water-separating fuel filter. Sludge and debris littered the bottom of a plastic container.

 

Performing such analysis at home, you might see water, heavier than gas, sink to the bottom of the container. Shake it (careful not to spill), and if you see bubbles in there, resembling vinegar and oil dressing, that’s water. If you see what looks like coffee grounds or dirt floating in there, you need to consult a qualified mechanic. Cap and dispose of your sample at the hazardous waste drop station at your local landfill. Avoid any source of flame or sparks when you assess fuel or fuel system elements.

 

Water condensation in the fuel tank is another worry, particularly with the alcohol content in ethanol fuels. Alcohol absorbs water, setting off a cascade of problems. If you have a choice, look for ethanol-free gasoline (drive out of the way, if you have to), and never settle for greater than 10 percent ethanol (E10). Otherwise, consult a mechanic to ensure your fuel system components are ethanol-compatible; that should include the installation of a 10-micron fuel filter, as well as assessment of your fuel tank—which may need to be drained and cleaned to remove water and deposits.

 

 

One type of product which breaks down water in fuel and reduces phase separation associated with ethanol.

 

 

 

Fuel Stabilizers

 

Fuel stabilizers seldom cross the minds of most Floridians, but products like STA-BIL, STAR TRON or the engine manufacturer’s specified additive are a big help if you know the boat will sit for more than a month. Of course, the easiest thing to do is simply run the boat on a regular basis. “My boat hasn’t been in the ocean since last year,” said mechanic Wayne Watson, “but it gets run every month. I start with the flusher on it and let it run 15 to 20 minutes so that it gets to that full operating temperature.”

 

The goal is to prevent the vapor separation tank, or VST, from emptying as a result of evaporation. As gas evaporates, it leaves varnish in the VST. The fuel pump, exposed to oxygen, may rust. Either process may introduce damaging elements into your engine when you crank it. Result: Clogged injectors, possibly a blown powerhead.

 

Steer Clear of Trouble

 

Cable steering bugaboos represent another trouble spot for part-time boaters.

 

With inadequate maintenance and infrequent use, corrosion may cause the cable to “freeze up.” Hear the bang of metal on metal at the boat ramp? Safe to assume it’s a boater attempting to loosen the steering ram. Sometimes it works, often it doesn’t.

 

There are several grease fittings on most steering systems and about once a month they should get a fresh shot with a grease gun. Also shoot some grease on your finger and apply it to the metal ram—the bar where the cable attaches to the engine. With routine application of grease, you should be able to turn a small outboard back and forth with ease.

 

Even with regular service, cable bends are problem areas. This is where most of the friction occurs. Stiff steering on an otherwise well-maintained boat may be a symptom of trouble. Consult your mechanic, soon. When a steering cable breaks while the boat is on plane, the boat turns abruptly. If you happen to be standing up when it happens, you probably get thrown out of the boat. This is the main reason why they install kill switches on outboard boats.

 

On my own boat, I recently upgraded to hydraulic steering. There’s virtually no maintenance and much less susceptibility to corrosion. However, the cost is more than double that of the best cable system. Mine was about $1,000 with a new wheel. But about the only thing that can go wrong here is a fluid leak, and when that happens, you will know it by the slick on the water, or the sheen in your bilge. The other advantage to hydraulics is that the boat is much easier to steer, and there is virtually no feedback from engine torque. You can let go of the wheel and the boat will hold course.

 

–Vance McCullough

Standard

JLL, CBRE hungry for more businesses and other brokerages in 2016

From left: Robert Sulentic, CEO of CBRE, and Colin Dyer, CEO of JLL

From left: Robert Sulentic, CEO of CBRE, and Colin Dyer, CEO of JLL

From the New York website: The biggest commercial real estate brokerages had a voracious appetite for brokerages and other businesses this year, and experts say they are likely to remain hungry in 2016.

CBRE Group and JLL, the largest of their kind in the world, scooped up several brokerages and niche businesses this year, a sign of a thriving market and a shift in demand for firms with greater global clout, the Wall Street Journal reported.

In September, Los Angeles-based CBRE closed on its $1.47 billion acquisition of Johnson Control’s facilities management business, Global Workplace Solutions. It also scooped up United Commercial Realty, Environmental Services Inc. and PKF Consulting. Chicago-based JLL closed or announced 25 deals between the  2014 and the beginning of 2015, totaling more than $500 million, the newspaper reported.

Cushman & Wakefield, however, slowed its acquisitions after its $2 billion merger with DTZ. Analysts said Cushman likely isn’t keeping pace in the acquisition game because it has more debt than JLL and CBRE. The firm, however, seems poised to go public next year, which would help in competing with the two commercial giants.

The volume of acquisitions is, in part, thanks to record-high sales and prices. The firms are also trying to expand their international experience and rely less on volatile broker commissions.  [WSJ]Kathryn Brenzel

Standard

Matanzas Kayak Fishing

http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.jshttp://admin.brightcove.com/js/APIModules_all.jshttp://files.brightcove.com/bc-mapi.js// http://www.floridasportsman.com/wp-content/plugins/imo-video-gallery/js/imo-video-gallery.js

Sketchy low tides and a minefield of oyster shell? No problem for these Northeast Florida kayakers.

Tom Derringer flips a keeper southern flounder sunny side up. Kayaks are great in shallow areas where the flatfish stack up.

Edward Abbey once said if you want to see the desert, get down on your knees and start crawling. Kayaking is the boating equivalent, with fish and other wildlife only inches away. With shrimp skipping around us, we paddle vigorously up a winding creek near Matanzas Inlet against the tide, hugging the banks to avoid the main current. Tom Derringer from Jacksonville makes it look easy, while I gamely keep up or even pass him. After seven years without paddling a kayak, this isn’t so hard: The loaner ’yak is responsive and scoots along. We follow a winding marsh where regular boats fear to go when the tide is falling. Just behind us is Tom’s son Todd, recent winner of the Jacksonville Kayak Fishing Classic Tournament, paddling with three-year-old Kristen wedged in. Three generations of Derringers making the dawn patrol. Can this family fish kayaks or what?

Stopping to cast, I look up and notice both boats are landing flounder. These guys prefer a slow, twitchy retrieve with a baitfish-shaped, scented Gulp! lure. The redfish and flounder certainly favor it, as we’re about to find out, even in a murky, falling tide. Flounder hang on to it while thoughtfully chewing; a count of 30 before setting the hook earns this father-and-son team consistent hookups. Often they land a dozen flounder per trip. Keeper fish—12 inches or better, within the 10-per-person bag limit—are stashed in Todd’s bow compartment, where an insulated icebag waits.

They move on, paddling onto a broad flat in only a foot of water that continues to drop, oyster reefs appearing here and there. Hard country for an outboard motor. We continue to fish, staking out each boat with old golf clubs that have their heads removed. Just shove it in the bottom on a short leash, and the kayak stops even in this brisk west wind. Pitch up against the shoreline, twitch that bait slow and bang! Two more flounder. Baked flounder in lemon pepper seems only hours away.

As the tide drops and slows, we move out into a broad lake in two feet of water, virtually cut off from the outside world. It’s time to bait up for redfish. Earlier during our creek passage, mullet and shrimp had jumped around us in the shallows, with a 2-pound mullet landing with a smack where my open camera bag had been just moments before. I fell on him with a club, and we used him for cutbait. Using bait is enough to make some kayak purists shiver like a hound dog passing peach pits, but at low tide when the water is

 

murky and restricted, you can’t beat a chunk of mullet for bigger redfish. On the last trip, Todd caught a 34-inch red during low-tide siesta.

 

It’s just common sense for local kayakers to stake out the center of a flat where remaining water gathers, and sit there with baits set out. In a kayak, you don’t pick up and run miles to another spot that has more water. These guys stay out there during most of an entire tide cycle—the most vigorous tides in Florida except for Fernandina. In warm weather, an umbrella and nap is practical here while waiting for that sudden bite. We settle into a stupor, waiting for the water to return, with Kristen sleeping sitting upright, wedged between her dad’s feet, padded by a swimming vest. (That sweaty three-year-old is a natural for the outdoors, part of a dying breed these days. Nine hours in a kayak and nary a complaint).

A big gafftop catfish, a few blue crabs, then a call on the small walkie-talkie. It’s Tom, a dot on the horizon, probing a creek where the first of an incoming tide is pouring in. He’s found the redfish. Crossing this big flat seems dubious after pulling up our golf club stakes, but we skate across the wind, watching Tom’s boat slowly grow bigger. Is he unhooking another redfish? Yes. New, cleaner water is gushing in from the Atlantic around his ’yak. The scented plastic baits fly left and right, catching more redfish and flounder, while the trout elude us. This is game time. A smaller, unfamiliar spin reel with braid line whips my plastic bait a good distance. Why is it unfamiliar? Time to give witness.

Kayaking is low-tech, low-cost fishing, but tough duty for rods and reels. Even in this shallow water, it’s easy to lose a fishing rod. With a lack of inboard space, you have to keep each rod jutting over the water. Shore vegetation or even a rocking motion might make a rod disappear, unless properly seated in a rod holder. Earlier that morning, my rod holder couldn’t be reached without my leaning way forward in a jackknife position like a yoga-person. So, I unscrewed the 8-inch stern hatch behind the seat and laid the rod butt inside, within easy reach. After stowing the rod and paddling 300 yards to the next spot, I was shocked to see my spin outfit (veteran of five countries!) missing. My beloved travel rod and Cabo reel lay in a foot of murky water that perfectly concealed it, even though two of us backtracked my exact route on foot through mud and occasional oysters. A sad loss.

The Derringers are well-equipped with extra rods per ’yak and lent me another, and allowed as how they’d lost several in past years. The lesson here is that ‘yak fishing can be tough on equipment at times, with occasional losses. Indeed, my camera bag was splattered with mud and drying salt, barely protecting an expensive camera. The waterproof, rubber bag underneath it was too much hassle to use when the action got hot.

More lunch for the paddlers, even cold fruit and half-frozen water bottles. It’s isolated out here without a boat in sight. But there is a pine tree shoreline with solid ground in the near distance. “We try to paddle to areas that boats simply can’t go,” says Tom. “A lot of new kayakers go to the same spots they fished with their boats, but the big advantage here is the ability to fish skinny water where bait and predators meet. Because our local bays often have a soft, muddy bottom, wadefishing is difficult, too. Kayaks offer the chance to fish muddy bottom, where redfish root around for their dinner.”

That explained the lack of wade fishermen on a Saturday.

After a long day we retreat back toward civilization, fighting an incoming tide but aided by our umbrellas, which act as a sail.

Back on the ICW shoreline of Highway AIA, I clamber out and drag the light ’yak higher up the beach before

 

another boat wake arrives. Miss Amy is parked close by after an excellent day at the beach, and plies me with Advil and “cold pop with foam on top,” as they say in Louisiana. Soon enough, all the world is right. We both ease toward the fish cooler, checking up on that flounder dinner.

 

The crew compare flounders. Note landing nets at the ready, vital equipment for a great-eating fish that’s also notorious for shaking off the hook at boatside.  

Hotspots Around St. Augustine

The Derringer kayak family prefers Pellicer Flat, which has about eight creeks that wind their way in from both the ICW and the main feeder creek, which is called “Porpoise Creek” or East Summer Haven River. Many flats to the west of the ICW, south of nearby Road 206, are too shallow at low tide for most boats to go. But kayakers can portage across sandbars that may entirely block an entrance to deeper water on the other side. Mullet are trapped in these small ponds and that’s where redfish feast on them. And kayak-equipped anglers feast on the redfish. Later that night, anyway.

The 206 flats (visible from the ICW bridge) and Devil’s Elbow area are full of redfish and a favorite spot for kayakers and tournament anglers. The dozens of creeks around Matanzas Inlet hold bounties of flounder, trout and redfish. Most redfish will be in the 15- to 24-inch range. Sometimes they locate a bonus school of 30-inch redfish in there.

Even farther south near Palm Coast, Bing’s Landing is a great launch spot. Directly across from the ramp is an area known as Long Creek that winds through the area and has reds, trout, flounder, occasional snook and some tarpon roaming the shallows. These fish feed on an abundance of mullet, blue crabs and shrimp.  FS

First Published Florida Sportsman April 2008

Standard